Tag Archives: japan

How to Design a Nuclear Fallout Shelter

Nuclear fallout shelters have been stigmatized as the ultimate prep for the paranoid and the butt of many jokes. But now that we’ve all been reminded that nuclear accidents can happen, nobody is laughing anymore. My hope is that nuclear preparedness becomes a topic we’re more comfortable talking about again. I’d hate to see us […]

Treehouse Hideaway cafe in Harajuku

My friend Jared Braiterman has been in Japan for many months now and blogging about his adventures at Tokyo Green Space. Here’s what his blog says about his project: Tokyo Green Space examines the potential for micro-green spaces to transform the world’s largest city into an urban forest that supports bio-diversity, the environment, and human community. He […]

Tiny House Cluster Under Glass

This was sent to me by Joseph Sandy, who has also helped me out a bit on my Who’s Next entry.  It’s a house in Buzen, Japan designed by the architects at Suppose design office that’s more like a cluster to tiny homes. The ‘streets’ have glass roofs and exterior walls to help strengthen the […]

Tiny in Tokyo

These tiny hotel capsules were originally created about 20 years ago to provide an inexpensive lodging option for those who might have missed the last train home. They measure about are about 6.5-feet deep, 5-feet wide but zero standing room. Stacked two high on two sides of a narrow corridor this type of accommodation provides […]

Earthbag Eco-village in Uganda

While I make my living as a web designer my education and training is as a potter… which has given me a particularly close bond to… well… dirt. Construction techniques like adobe, rammed earth, cob, and earthbag are really beginning to appeal to me more and more. There’s something about building a home from the […]

Small House Design Techniques Increase Perceived Size

I just stumbled on this National Geographic video on YouTube. It describes a small (not tiny) house in Japan where the architect used many simple design techniques to increase the perceived size. The actual footprint is 320 square feet and the total size is 899 square feet. Many of the techniques involved manipulating light by […]

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