Which Aesthetic Do You Prefer?

I was happy to see more tiny house plans spring onto the market, this time from Free Green. I first spotted these on Jetson Green where Preston included a survey asking his readers which aesthetic they liked most. I was surprised to see that the modern design was the clear winner. I love the look of modern homes but I think my next home will be more traditional simply because a pitched roof with an overhand is more practical and longer lasting. I am curious to know what all of you are thinking. I’ve posted a survey below these photos and I’m wondering which tiny house aesthetic you prefer.

Free Green Tiny House Plans Modern Home

Free Green Tiny House Plans Rustic

Free Green Tiny House Plans Traditional

Sorry, there are no polls available at the moment.

Image credit to Free Green.

21 thoughts on “Which Aesthetic Do You Prefer?

  1. Mrs. Micah says:

    With those particular 3 houses I prefer the modern. It's perfectly-situated and it's just lovely. OTOH, I'd prefer the rustic if I were going to be in a very wooded area, rather than in a clearing w/rocks.

  2. Mrs. Micah says:

    With those particular 3 houses I prefer the modern. It's perfectly-situated and it's just lovely. OTOH, I'd prefer the rustic if I were going to be in a very wooded area, rather than in a clearing w/rocks.

  3. dbneeley says:

    Michael,

    In large part, “Modern” design elements have now been with us since the 1930s. Flat roofs, in particular, can be problematical over time. Also, there is little reason to paint–that is far more an aesthetic than a practical matter, after all, and it sets up an endless cycle of renewing the paint periodically for little if any actual protection to the structure.

  4. dbneeley says:

    Michael,

    In large part, “Modern” design elements have now been with us since the 1930s. Flat roofs, in particular, can be problematical over time. Also, there is little reason to paint–that is far more an aesthetic than a practical matter, after all, and it sets up an endless cycle of renewing the paint periodically for little if any actual protection to the structure.

  5. Grant Wagner says:

    I also highly dislike “Modern” design. They always seem to be made of plastic or concrete, neither of which are very “Green” materials. The traditionals aren't as bad, but I just really like the feel and look of real wood. As was stated before, flat roofs do have signiifcant maintainance isses as well.

  6. Grant Wagner says:

    I also highly dislike “Modern” design. They always seem to be made of plastic or concrete, neither of which are very “Green” materials. The traditionals aren't as bad, but I just really like the feel and look of real wood. As was stated before, flat roofs do have signiifcant maintainance isses as well.

  7. daltxguy says:

    ok, I had to vote other. Mainly because this is a hugely ambiguous question.

    The modern building is ghastly but in a highly desirable setting, next to the ocean or a lakeside surrounded by woods – isolated, private but close to nature.

    The rustic is a horrible rendition that's not even quite rustic. It has no character, no landscaping ( why is this house in the middle of giant empty, flat field?) and an insult to the wood it is clothed in.

    Truth be told, the so called 'traditional' is the nicest one here -but again it's because it has a few details, a nice little fence to mark the border between yard and rest of world making it feel safer and then some nice landscaping around the perimeter giving it color and texture.

    So, in the end, in my opinion, it is not the aesthetic that's likely the most important element. What I seek in a house first and foremost is that it makes me feel comfortable and part of that is that it should look equally comfortable in its surroundings and should be a tribute to the materials from which it is made and should honor the resources by being a quality building, designed to look and feel right and perform to its intention for me and generations to come for at least the next 500 years.

    In this sense, I should thing the vernacular might be the aesthetic which suits me the best built with quality, locally sourced materials, with a great design, in a suitably great location.

    For that reason, I pick other because

  8. daltxguy says:

    ok, I had to vote other. Mainly because this is a hugely ambiguous question.

    The modern building is ghastly but in a highly desirable setting, next to the ocean or a lakeside surrounded by woods – isolated, private but close to nature.

    The rustic is a horrible rendition that's not even quite rustic. It has no character, no landscaping ( why is this house in the middle of giant empty, flat field?) and an insult to the wood it is clothed in.

    Truth be told, the so called 'traditional' is the nicest one here -but again it's because it has a few details, a nice little fence to mark the border between yard and rest of world making it feel safer and then some nice landscaping around the perimeter giving it color and texture.

    So, in the end, in my opinion, it is not the aesthetic that's likely the most important element. What I seek in a house first and foremost is that it makes me feel comfortable and part of that is that it should look equally comfortable in its surroundings and should be a tribute to the materials from which it is made and should honor the resources by being a quality building, designed to look and feel right and perform to its intention for me and generations to come for at least the next 500 years.

    In this sense, I should thing the vernacular might be the aesthetic which suits me the best built with quality, locally sourced materials, with a great design, in a suitably great location.

  9. Mark Harrison says:

    Aesthetics like beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Each of these styles has been set in a landscape that adds or substracts from the style and it's stereotypical setting in the beholders minds eye.

    A modern design still has to be functional as well as looking right but there is something about the uber efficient modern design set into a soft landscape that enhances the look, gives it an edge and makes it look dramatic or maybe add to the dramatic setting.

    For sustainability I'd prefer hybrid designs where natural (local) materials are used in harmony with modern materials to produce form, function and aesthetic good lookers!

  10. Mark Harrison says:

    Aesthetics like beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Each of these styles has been set in a landscape that adds or substracts from the style and it's stereotypical setting in the beholders minds eye.

    A modern design still has to be functional as well as looking right but there is something about the uber efficient modern design set into a soft landscape that enhances the look, gives it an edge and makes it look dramatic or maybe add to the dramatic setting.

    For sustainability I'd prefer hybrid designs where natural (local) materials are used in harmony with modern materials to produce form, function and aesthetic good lookers!

  11. Ed Davies says:

    Whether a building is a one year old cabin which is pretending it was built 150 years ago or a wooden box which is made to look like it was extruded from a starship it just irritates me. I like buildings to look like neat and tidy examples of construction which makes pragmatic use of the available materials (whether that's mud or polycarbonate) for sensible reasons appropriate to the location.

    An example: the Camino Sunspace House (currently owned by Steve Roberts http://twitter.com/nomadness):

    http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=06xVLZ4EbBcC

  12. Ed Davies says:

    Whether a building is a one year old cabin which is pretending it was built 150 years ago or a wooden box which is made to look like it was extruded from a starship it just irritates me. I like buildings to look like neat and tidy examples of construction which makes pragmatic use of the available materials (whether that's mud or polycarbonate) for sensible reasons appropriate to the location.

    An example: the Camino Sunspace House (currently owned by Steve Roberts http://twitter.com/nomadness):

    http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=06xVLZ4EbBcC

  13. pfkw says:

    I like a combination of the traditional style with the windows of the modern style. I think it might be the open-air feeling of all the windows that make so many people like the “box.” Otherwise, the flat roof and lack of overhang is highly impractical. We have a 10'x20' old adobe outbuilding on our property here in Arizona and it has a flat roof with vigas–very charming, but even though we get so little rain, we still fight intermittent roof leaks frequently. So much so, to the point that we had the metal fabricators bend a one-piece roof for it in order to end that battle and also save the walls that were becoming eroded by water, since old adobes typically had no overhangs to speak of. We have masked the metal with terra cotta tiles and (many dollars later) have saved this old Butterfield Stage era building. So overhangs and pitched roofs still make the most sense–a long answer to a short question 🙂

  14. pfkw says:

    I like a combination of the traditional style with the windows of the modern style. I think it might be the open-air feeling of all the windows that make so many people like the “box.” Otherwise, the flat roof and lack of overhang is highly impractical. We have a 10'x20' old adobe outbuilding on our property here in Arizona and it has a flat roof with vigas–very charming, but even though we get so little rain, we still fight intermittent roof leaks frequently. So much so, to the point that we had the metal fabricators bend a one-piece roof for it in order to end that battle and also save the walls that were becoming eroded by water, since old adobes typically had no overhangs to speak of. We have masked the metal with terra cotta tiles and (many dollars later) have saved this old Butterfield Stage era building. So overhangs and pitched roofs still make the most sense–a long answer to a short question 🙂

  15. Sonja Lowen says:

    I think that the roofline should reflect the surrounds. Although the modern house wih the flat roof is aesthetically pleasing of its own accord its roofline does not reflect the geographical landscape of its surrounds and consequently looks out of place. There's an architectural discord and tension that has been created between the building and its location.

    Sonja

  16. Sonja Lowen says:

    I think that the roofline should reflect the surrounds. Although the modern house wih the flat roof is aesthetically pleasing of its own accord its roofline does not reflect the geographical landscape of its surrounds and consequently looks out of place. There's an architectural discord and tension that has been created between the building and its location.

    Sonja

  17. april_idaho says:

    I think a house has to have more size if it's going to buck the trend of the environment successfully…. a tiny modern box in the middle of an otherwise nature-only scene just doesn't look right (in my opinion).

  18. april_idaho says:

    I think a house has to have more size if it's going to buck the trend of the environment successfully…. a tiny modern box in the middle of an otherwise nature-only scene just doesn't look right (in my opinion).

  19. pierrebo says:

    The rustic and traditional houses are silly caricatures of what a child imagines a house to be. They seem like the same basic house plan decorated in 2 kinds of decorator kitsch, depending on your lifestyle fantasy. I’m reminded of those retro kit car roadsters and wonder why people need to recall a very particular era in rural/small town life.

    The modernIST house is also recalling the past ironically enough, but the retro style used is one which adapts universally to most environments due to its abstract qualities and practical building techniques.

    It is by far the most appealing to me for very clear reasons: it is sited perfectly as an ‘object in the landscape’, it has gorgeous proportions, the relationships between solids and voids and planes are elegant, it has practical and poetic details such as the corner glass (view) and wrapped canopy (shade/weather), it is honest, tough and delicate at the same time. The roof may not actually be flat…often that horizontal line is a parapet wall with a single slope running down the back side…or it could also be a green roof.

    My only critique would be the choice of prefab panels…I would have used recycled wood siding unpainted to emphasize the integration of colour and texture from the local landscapes.

  20. sapphyredragon says:

    Interesting. I guess when I voted, I voted entirely based on the house itself and did not even consider the surrounding area. I thought that was what we were looking for?
    I much prefer the rustic. That is pretty much exactly what I want, including the beautiful patio. Yeah, the landscape isn’t ideal, but to me that just means I’ve got more to work with. That would become a gorgeous garden in no time! I would put a greenhouse in as well.
    That being said, I like the traditional home almost as much. Never been a fan of that horrible siding, though.

    About the modern home, I wouldn’t necessarily say that the flat roof has more issues. If you do it correctly and in the right environment (aka not heavy snow areas), flat roofs are not really any more difficult or problematic. It’s a great place for a garden, which will help with water run-off and might be helpful as a natural water filtration system! Mind you, I prefer a slight incline and a roof covered in solar panels. : )

    All that being said, I’m not sure if it took my vote? I clicked submit, but nothing happened. I chose the rustic.

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